Darrell Hudson

Clipping interesting articles & photos

How Facebook Ships Code

Even with the corrections (re: the FB employee) I find the cultural implications at Facebook very interesting. I work in a company the requires intense engineering development, but still utilizes the cubicle model. I find that this is a major drain on productivity and slows our release schedule for a variety reasons (less camaraderie, less face time, lowered team cohesion, etc) . I’m sure that the FB culture isn’t right for everyone, but I’m sure there is a nice midpoint between cubiclism and full-open culture. ~ Jack

Amplify’d from framethink.wordpress.com

I’m fascinated by the way Facebook operates.  It’s a very unique environment, not easily replicated (nor would their system work for all companies, even if they tried).  These are notes gathered from talking with many friends at Facebook about how the company develops and releases software.

Notes:

  • as of June 2010, the company has nearly 2000 employees, up from roughly 1100 employees 10 months ago.  Nearly doubling staff in under a year!

  • [EDIT thx fryfrog] “There are also very good safe guards in place to prevent anyone at the company from doing the horrible sorts of things you can imagine people have the power to do being on the inside. If you have to “become” someone who is asking for support, this is logged along with a reason and closely reviewed. Straying here is not tolerated, period.”

  • during monthly cross-team meetings, the engineers are the ones who present progress reports.  product marketing and product management attend these meetings, but if they are particularly outspoken, there is actually feedback to the leadership that “product spoke too much at the last meeting.”  they really want engineers to publicly own products and be the main point of contact for the things they built.

  • arguments about whether or not a feature idea is worth doing or not generally get resolved by just spending a week implementing it and then testing it on a sample of users, e.g., 1% of Nevada users.

  • re: surprise at lack of QA or automated unit tests — “most engineers are capable of writing bug-free code.  it’s just that they don’t have an incentive to do so at most companies.  when there’s a QA department, it’s easy to just throw it over to them to find the errors.”  [EDIT: please note that this was subjective opinion, I chose to include it in this post because of the stark contrast that this draws with standard development practice at other companies]

  • [CORRECTION — thx epriest] “There is mandatory code review for all changes (i.e., by one or more engineers). I think the article is just saying that Zuck doesn’t look at every change personally.”

  • [CORRECTION thx fryfrog] “All changes are reviewed by at least one person, and the system is easy for anyone else to look at and review your code even if you don’t invite them to. It would take intentionally malicious behavior to get un-reviewed code in.”

  • engineers generally want to work on infrastructure, scalability and “hard problems” — that’s where all the prestige is.  can be hard to get engineers excited about working on front-end projects and user interfaces.  this is the opposite of what you find in some consumer businesses where everyone wants to work on stuff that customers touch so you can point to a particular user experience and say “I built that.”  At facebook, the back-end stuff like news feed algorithms, ad-targeting algorithms, memcache optimizations, etc. are the juicy projects that engineers want.

  • ops team is really well-trained, well-respected, and very business-aware.  their server metrics go beyond the usual error logs, load & memory utilization stats — also include user behavior.  E.g., if a new release changes the percentage of users who engage with Facebook features, the ops team will see that in their metrics and may stop a release for that reason so they can investigate.

  • getting svn-blamed, publicly shamed, or slipping projects too often will result in an engineer getting fired.  ”it’s a very high performance culture”.  people that aren’t productive or aren’t super talented really stick out.  Managers will literally take poor performers aside within 6 months of hiring and say “this just isn’t working out, you’re not a good culture fit”.  this actually applies at every level of the company, even C-level and VP-level hires have been quickly dismissed if they aren’t super productive.

  • [CORRECTION, thx epriest]  “People do not get called out for introducing bugs. They only get called out if they ask for changes to go out with the release but aren’t around to support them in case something goes wrong (and haven’t found someone to cover for you).”

  • [CORRECTION, thx epriest] “Getting blamed will NOT get you fired. We are extremely forgiving in this respect, and most of the senior engineers have pushed at least one horrible thing, myself included. As far as I know, no one has ever been fired for making mistakes of this nature.”

  • [CORRECTION, thx fryfrog] “I also don’t know of anyone who has been fired for making mistakes like are mentioned in the article. I know of people who have inadvertently taken down the site. They work hard to fix what ever caused the problem and everyone learns from it. The public shaming is far more effective than fear of being fired, in my opinion.”

Read more at framethink.wordpress.com

 

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